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GOSPEL BASED DISCIPLESHIP

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"We have this hope,
  an anchor for the soul..."
-(Heb. 6:19)

Welcome to

Gospel Based Discipleship
 

We have all been learning how to cope with this new world that we find ourselves in. We have been in isolation, quarantining ourselves and our families, parents and kids have had to learn “virtually.” And all of the aspects of our spiritual lives have moved to an online world as well, worship, formation, and as much fellowship as we can muster. Some of us have lost our jobs, others of us have been furloughed with the hope of returning soon. Many of us are unable to see grandchildren or to come and go from our assisted living communities. Still, five months in and we don’t really know when and how things will get back to any level or normality. We don’t even really know when we will be able to go back to what we consider normal worship and community life in our beloved Trinity Church space.

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It’s not far of a stretch to say that our lives have been turned upside down and we are all in the middle of a great and terrible storm. Which reminds me of one of the Church’s great hymns, popularly known as “The Navy Hymn,” which includes the refrain, O Hear Us When We Cry to Thee For Those In Peril On the Sea. 


The hymn reminds us that in the midst of all this uncertainty we have a hope, an anchor that will center us and hold on to us through any storm. My prayer is that Gospel Based Discipleship will be one way we will continue to stay connected spiritually as Trinity Episcopal Church in the months ahead.


Gospel Based Discipleship will bind us as a church. When we know everyone at Trinity is deeply engaging in the same Gospel passage we, even more than before, will be bound to one another in faith and love.  

September 5, 2021

MARK 7:24-37

 

Jesus set out and went away to the region of Tyre. He entered a house and did not want anyone to know he was there. Yet he could not escape notice, but a woman whose little daughter had an unclean spirit immediately heard about him, and she came and bowed down at his feet. Now the woman was a Gentile, of Syrophoenician origin. She begged him to cast the demon out of her daughter. He said to her, “Let the children be fed first, for it is not fair to take the children’s food and throw it to the dogs.” But she answered him, “Sir, even the dogs under the table eat the children’s crumbs.” Then he said to her, “For saying that, you may go—the demon has left your daughter.” So she went home, found the child lying on the bed, and the demon gone.


Then he returned from the region of Tyre, and went by way of Sidon towards the Sea of Galilee, in the region of the Decapolis. They brought to him a deaf man who had an impediment in his speech; and they begged him to lay his hand on him. He took him aside in private, away from the crowd, and put his fingers into his ears, and he spat and touched his tongue. Then looking up to heaven, he sighed and said to him, “Ephphatha,” that is, “Be opened.” And immediately his ears were opened, his tongue was released, and he spoke plainly. Then Jesus ordered them to tell no one; but the more he ordered them, the more zealously they proclaimed it. They were astounded beyond measure, saying, “He has done everything well; he even makes the deaf to hear and the mute to speak.”


Reflections:


1) The Gentile Syrophoenician woman is bold with Jesus. She doesn’t let his terse answer be the last word. When have you been bold with God and let God know exactly how you are feeling? How does that feel? 


2) Jesus healed a deaf man and gave him the ability to speak clearly.  
How does the Gospel affect what we hear and how we speak? Are our words instruments of healing or hurt? 

 

September 12, 2021

MARK 8:27-38

 

Jesus went on with his disciples to the villages of Caesarea Philippi; and on the way he asked his disciples, “Who do people say that I am?” And they answered him, “John the Baptist; and others, Elijah; and still others, one of the prophets.” He asked them, “But who do you say that I am?” Peter answered him, “You are the Messiah.” And he sternly ordered them not to tell anyone about him.


Then he began to teach them that the Son of Man must undergo great suffering, and be rejected by the elders, the chief priests, and the scribes, and be killed, and after three days rise again. He said all this quite openly. And Peter took him aside and began to rebuke him. But turning and looking at his disciples, he rebuked Peter and said, “Get behind me, Satan! For you are setting your mind not on divine things but on human things.”


He called the crowd with his disciples, and said to them, “If any want to become my followers, let them deny themselves and take up their cross and follow me. For those who want to save their life will lose it, and those who lose their life for my sake, and for the sake of the gospel, will save it. For what will it profit them to gain the whole world and forfeit their life? Indeed, what can they give in return for their life? Those who are ashamed of me and of my words in this adulterous and sinful generation, of them the Son of Man will also be ashamed when he comes in the glory of his Father with the holy angels.”

Reflection:


1) “But who do you say that I am?” Jesus asks the question of his disciples in this text but the question rolls down through the ages to you. Who is Jesus to you? What difference does he make in your life?

 

September 19, 2021

MARK 9:30-37

 

Jesus and his disciples passed through Galilee. He did not want anyone to know it; for he was teaching his disciples, saying to them, “The Son of Man is to be betrayed into human hands, and they will kill him, and three days after being killed, he will rise again.” But they did not understand what he was saying and were afraid to ask him.


Then they came to Capernaum; and when he was in the house he asked them, “What were you arguing about on the way?” But they were silent, for on the way they had argued with one another who was the greatest. He sat down, called the twelve, and said to them, “Whoever wants to be first must be last of all and servant of all.” Then he took a little child and put it among them; and taking it in his arms, he said to them, “Whoever welcomes one such child in my name welcomes me, and whoever welcomes me welcomes not me but the one who sent me.”


Reflection: 


1) The way of Jesus is love, compassion and peace. This way was an embarrassment to the disciples who wanted a king with a righteous army. Have you ever felt that the way of Jesus is too “soft” to actually work? Can the world really be changed by love? 

 

September 26, 2021

MARK 9:38-50

 

John said to Jesus, “Teacher, we saw someone casting out demons in your name, and we tried to stop him, because he was not following us.” But Jesus said, “Do not stop him; for no one who does a deed of power in my name will be able soon afterward to speak evil of me. Whoever is not against us is for us. For truly I tell you, whoever gives you a cup of water to drink because you bear the name of Christ will by no means lose the reward.


“If any of you put a stumbling block before one of these little ones who believe in me, it would be better for you if a great millstone were hung around your neck and you were thrown into the sea. If your hand causes you to stumble, cut it off; it is better for you to enter life maimed than to have two hands and to go to hell, to the unquenchable fire. And if your foot causes you to stumble, cut it off; it is better for you to enter life lame than to have two feet and to be thrown into hell. And if your eye causes you to stumble, tear it out; it is better for you to enter the kingdom of God with one eye than to have two eyes and to be thrown into hell, where their worm never dies, and the fire is never quenched.


“For everyone will be salted with fire. Salt is good; but if salt has lost its saltiness, how can you season it? Have salt in yourselves, and be at peace with one another.”


Reflection:


1) “Whoever is not against us is for us.” This is a powerful statement by Jesus. Do you know someone who is not a follower of Jesus who still does Jesus’ good works? 

 

October 3, 2021

MARK 10:2-16

 

Some Pharisees came, and to test Jesus they asked, “Is it lawful for a man to divorce his wife?” He answered them, “What did Moses command you?” They said, “Moses allowed a man to write a certificate of dismissal and to divorce her.” But Jesus said to them, “Because of your hardness of heart he wrote this commandment for you. But from the beginning of creation, ‘God made them male and female.’ ‘For this reason a man shall leave his father and mother and be joined to his wife, and the two shall become one flesh.’ So they are no longer two, but one flesh. Therefore what God has joined together, let no one separate.”


Then in the house the disciples asked him again about this matter. He said to them, “Whoever divorces his wife and marries another commits adultery against her; and if she divorces her husband and marries another, she commits adultery.”


People were bringing little children to him in order that he might touch them; and the disciples spoke sternly to them. But when Jesus saw this, he was indignant and said to them, “Let the little children come to me; do not stop them; for it is to such as these that the kingdom of God belongs. Truly I tell you, whoever does not receive the kingdom of God as a little child will never enter it.” And he took them up in his arms, laid his hands on them, and blessed them.


Reflection:


1) The question of divorce in the scripture is complex and can’t be 
parsed out here. Remember, however, in this passage Jesus is speaking not as much to our modern understanding and practice of divorce but to the “hard hearts” of men who have left their spouses, often alone and destitute. Interestingly, he closes with a passage about being kind to children. Kindness in relationships, especially relationships where you have power over the other is a hallmark of my Gospel, says Jesus. Is there a relationship in your life that needs kindness from you right now? 

 

October 10, 2021

MARK 10:17-31

 

As Jesus was setting out on a journey, a man ran up and knelt before him, and asked him, “Good Teacher, what must I do to inherit eternal life?” Jesus said to him, “Why do you call me good? No one is good but God alone. You know the commandments: ‘You shall not murder; You shall not commit adultery; You shall not steal; You shall not bear false witness; You shall not defraud; Honor your father and mother.’” He said to him, “Teacher, I have kept all these since my youth.” Jesus, looking at him, loved him and said, “You lack one thing; go, sell what you own, and give the money to the poor, and you will have treasure in heaven; then come, follow me.” When he heard this, he was shocked and went away grieving, for he had many possessions.


Then Jesus looked around and said to his disciples, “How hard it will be for those who have wealth to enter the kingdom of God!” And the disciples were perplexed at these words. But Jesus said to them again, “Children, how hard it is to enter the kingdom of God! It is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle than for someone who is rich to enter the kingdom of God.” They were greatly astounded and said to one another, “Then who can be saved?” Jesus looked at them and said, “For mortals it is impossible, but not for God; for God all things are possible.”


Peter began to say to him, “Look, we have left everything and followed you.” Jesus said, “Truly I tell you, there is no one who has left house or brothers or sisters or mother or father or children or fields, for my sake and for the sake of the good news, who will not receive a hundredfold now in this age—houses, brothers and sisters, mothers and children, and fields with persecutions—and in the age to come eternal life. But many who are first will be last, and the last will be first.”


Reflection: 


1) This passage raises many questions about what it takes to follow Jesus. Perhaps the most important part, however, is the Question and answer between the disciples and Jesus, “Then who can be saved?” “Jesus looked at them and said, “For mortals it is impossible, but not for God; for God all things are possible.” 

2) Following Jesus is a call to a new life that often seems impossible. How is God working in your life to make the impossible possible? Looking back in time, can you discern a pattern of God’s faithfulness and redemption at work in your life?

 

October 17, 2021

MARK 10:35-45

 

James and John, the sons of Zebedee, came forward to Jesus and said to him, “Teacher, we want you to do for us whatever we ask of you.” And he said to them, “What is it you want me to do for you?” And they said to him, “Grant us to sit, one at your right hand and one at your left, in your glory.” But Jesus said to them, “You do not know what you are asking. Are you able to drink the cup that I drink, or be baptized with the baptism that I am baptized with?” They replied, “We are able.” Then Jesus said to them, “The cup that I drink you will drink; and with the baptism with which I am baptized, you will be baptized; but to sit at my right hand or at my left is not mine to grant, but it is for those for whom it has been prepared.”


When the ten heard this, they began to be angry with James and John. So Jesus called them and said to them, “You know that among the Gentiles those whom they recognize as their rulers lord it over them, and their great ones are tyrants over them. But it is not so among you; but whoever wishes to become great among you must be your servant, and whoever wishes to be first among you must be slave of all. For the Son of Man came not to be served but to serve, and to give his life a ransom for many.”


Reflection: 


1) James and John expose themselves as spoiled children. They want the power that they believe will come when Jesus is enthroned as king. Jesus sets them straight about his kingship. Seeking power is present in many aspects of our lives. Where are you able to give up human power to be “Christ’s servant…and humble yourself to accept the Spirit’s gift – the amazing power of God?” 

 

October 24, 2021

MARK 10:16-52

 

Jesus and his disciples came to Jericho. As he and his disciples and a large crowd were leaving Jericho, Bartimaeus son of Timaeus, a blind beggar, was sitting by the roadside. When he heard that it was Jesus of Nazareth, he began to shout out and say, “Jesus, Son of David, have mercy on me!” Many sternly ordered him to be quiet, but he cried out even more loudly, “Son of David, have mercy on me!” Jesus stood still and said, “Call him here.” And they called the blind man, saying to him, “Take heart; get up, he is calling you.” So throwing off his cloak, he sprang up and came to Jesus. Then Jesus said to him, “What do you want me to do for you?” The blind man said to him, “My teacher, let me see again.” Jesus said to him, “Go; your faith has made you well.” Immediately he regained his sight and followed him on the way.


Reflection:


1) Jesus asks Bartimaeus, “What do you want me to do for you?” Jesus knew what he wanted but he wanted Bartimaeus to say it. Maybe just as much for himself as for Jesus. What do you want Jesus to do for you? Say it out loud!

 

October 31, 2021

MARK 12:28-34

 

One of the scribes came near and heard the Sadducees disputing with one another, and seeing that Jesus answered them well, he asked him, “Which commandment is the first of all?” Jesus answered, “The first is, ‘Hear, O Israel: the Lord our God, the Lord is one; you shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, and with all your soul, and with all your mind, and with all your strength.’ The second is this, ‘You shall love your neighbor as yourself.’ There is no other commandment greater than these.” Then the scribe said to him, “You are right, Teacher; you have truly said that ‘he is one, and besides him there is no other’; and ‘to love him with all the heart, and with all the understanding, and with all the strength,’ and ‘to love one’s neighbor as oneself,’ —this is much more important than all whole burnt offerings and sacrifices.” When Jesus saw that he answered wisely, he said to him, “You are not far from the kingdom of God.” After that no one dared to ask him any question.


Reflections: 


1) Loving ourselves is not an invitation to habitual self-indulgence. Often, self love demands discipline, discernment and sacrifice….  How do you need to love yourself today? What neighbor of yours needs love today? 
2) How does loving God and yourself make you more capable of  loving your neighbor or, as our baptismal promises state,  “to seek and serve Christ in all persons”?

 

November 7, 2021

MARK 12:38-44

 

As Jesus taught, he said, “Beware of the scribes, who like to walk around in long robes, and to be greeted with respect in the marketplaces, and to have the best seats in the synagogues and places of honor at banquets! They devour widows’ houses and for the sake of appearance say long prayers. They will receive the greater condemnation.”


He sat down opposite the treasury, and watched the crowd putting money into the treasury. Many rich people put in large sums. A poor widow came and put in two small copper coins, which are worth a penny. Then he called his disciples and said to them, “Truly I tell you, this poor widow has put in more than all those who are contributing to the treasury. For all of them have contributed out of their abundance; but she out of her poverty has put in everything she had, all she had to live on.”


Reflection:


1) Do you know what percentage of your income you give away each year? Knowing the percentage is the only way to evaluate the depth of your giving. Christians consider a “tithe,” 10% of income as a goal. Before or after taxes doesn’t matter. It may be a goal that is out of reach now. Sit down and calculate the percentage of your income that you give to those in need. There is no shame. If it’s a tenth or a half a percent, so be it. Maybe next year it can be 1%? Pray over it. What is Jesus calling you to do? 

 

November 14, 2021

MARK 13:1-8

 

As Jesus came out of the temple, one of his disciples said to him, “Look, Teacher, what large stones and what large buildings!” Then Jesus asked him, “Do you see these great buildings? Not one stone will be left here upon another; all will be thrown down.”


When he was sitting on the Mount of Olives opposite the temple, Peter, James, John, and Andrew asked him privately, “Tell us, when will this be, and what will be the sign that all these things are about to be accomplished?” Then Jesus began to say to them, “Beware that no one leads you astray. Many will come in my name and say, ‘I am he!’ and they will lead many astray. When you hear of wars and rumors of wars, do not be alarmed; this must take place, but the end is still to come. For nation will rise against nation, and kingdom against kingdom; there will be earthquakes in various places; there will be famines. This is but the beginning of the birth pangs.


Reflection:


1) Jesus promises that the strife of this world will not last forever.  It will not be the last word. In that proclamation he implies we are to question what type of worldly value we place our hope in. What things in this world take your gaze off of God's promises? Where do you find hope?

 

November 21, 2021

john 18:33-37

 

Pilate entered the headquarters again, summoned Jesus, and asked him, “Are you the King of the Jews?” Jesus answered, “Do you ask this on your own, or did others tell you about me?” Pilate replied, “I am not a Jew, am I? Your own nation and the chief priests have handed you over to me. What have you done?” Jesus answered, “My kingdom is not from this world. If my kingdom were from this world, my followers would be fighting to keep me from being handed over to the Jews. But as it is, my kingdom is not from here.” Pilate asked him, “So you are a king?” Jesus answered, “You say that I am a king. For this I was born, and for this I came into the world, to testify to the truth. Everyone who belongs to the truth listens to my voice.” 


Reflection:


1) We live in a world that encourages us to believe everything is relative. What are the “truths” that matter to you and why?

 

Aids for Using Gospel Based Discipleship