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Racial Healing Workshops

Trinity is engaged in a journey of learning and transformation when it comes to the part of race in our past, our present, and in our future. Each step of this this journey gets us closer, we pray, to creating a community of true equity, inclusion, and justice.

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Trinity and the Story of Race in Asheville: 1849 to the early 1900s

Scott and David sketch out a brief and broad overview of Trinity's early history, from 1849 to the early 1900s, and, while acknowledging blindspots and many unknowns, explore key moments that intersect with race, slavery, and the aftermath of the Civil War.

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Trinity and the Story of Race in Asheville: Conversations, Expectations and Limitations

Who are we? As the downtown Episcopal Church and the largest Episcopal parish in the region, what things have we done and left undone regarding racial healing in our immediate area? Come and explore the unique history of the Civil Rights Movement in Asheville and at Trinity. Hear a frank history — good and bad — of Trinity’s earliest days during slavery and its immediate aftermath following the Civil War and more. We’ll also hear the story of our neighbors, as Trinity is just a few blocks from the historically black business district on Eagle Street. 

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Trinity and the Story of Race in Asheville: Civil Rights, Integration, and Beyond with Dr. Oralene Simmons

Join us in conversation with Dr. Oralene Simmons, founder of the Martin Luther King, Jr., Association of Asheville and Buncombe County. Dr. Simmons continues to be a Civil Rights leader in our area, work that began for her as a high school student. She was the first Black student to attend Mars Hill College.

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Trinity and the Story of Race in Asheville: St. Matthias and Trinity

Join Scott and David in conversation with the Rev. Jim Abbott, former rector of St. Matthias and author of a historical book on race in the Diocese of Western North Carolina to discuss the complex and complicated history of Trinity and St. Matthias.

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Trinity and the Story of Race in Asheville: Civil Rights, Banking, and Progress with Commissioner Al Whitesides

Join us this week as we welcome Buncombe County Commissioner Al Whitesides, who was the first African American banker in Asheville, as we reflect on the past and look to the future.

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Working for Racial Healing

Dr. Jospeh Fox, Vice-Chair of the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Association of Asheville and Buncombe Counties. Dr. Fox will share the story and work of the Buncombe County Remembrance Project. 

02

Working for Racial Healing

Dr. Jospeh Fox, Vice-Chair of the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Association of Asheville and Buncombe Counties. Dr. Fox will share the story and work of the Buncombe County Remembrance Project. 

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Monumental Decisions with Dr. Chris Graham 

Join Dr. Christopher Graham and the Rev. David Henson in a conversation about viewing the removal of Confederate monuments through the lens of faith and history.

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Monumental Decisions: Faith and Confederate Memorials

In our second and final installment, Dr. Christopher Graham, curator of exhibitions at the American Civil War Museum and historian at St. Paul's in Richmond discusses how his parish has addressed its racial legacy from the Civil War and beyond and how it's impacted their expression of faith. Plus, we get to your questions you sent it. 

Unrecorded Series:

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Reimagining Our Place in the Story:

In the summer of 2021 we held a series that explored faith by looking to theologians of color and how they had us to understand Christs call for reconciliation.

The group recently completed "Jesus and The Disinherited" by Howard Thurman.  Through our own stories of personal growth and findings from the texts, this group explores ways we can promote social justice, diversity, equity, and inclusion in our lives and faith community. 

Facilitators, Page McCorkle and Sharon Lechner, set shared intentions including:

  1. Building relationships, following Jesus into the wilderness, and learning together,

  2. Practicing making changes where we can, no matter how big or small,

  3. Committing to the work for a lifetime, making it a lifestyle choice

  4. Seeking the Third Way of gentleness, creativity, and divestment of power, not only in our antiracism work but in our relationships with each other.